Gender Pay Gap reporting

Gender Pay Gap legislation introduced in April 2017 requires all employers of 250 or more employees to publish information about Gender Pay Gaps by 30 March. Employers are required to publish data based on a specific set of formulae as set out in the guidance to the legislation.

Employers are required to calculate and publish the following gender pay data:

  • Mean Gender Pay Gap - the difference between the mean hourly rate of pay of male full pay relevant employees and that of female full-pay relevant employees.
  • Median Gender Pay Gap - the difference between the median hourly rate of pay of male full pay relevant employees and that of female full-pay relevant employees.
  • Mean Bonus Gap - the difference between the mean bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees.
  • Median Bonus Gap - the difference between the median bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees.
  • Bonus Proportions - the proportions of male and female relevant employees who were paid bonus pay during the relevant period.
  • Quartile Pay Bands – the proportions of male and female full-pay relevant employees in the lower, lower middle, upper middle and upper quartile pay bands.

This report reflects the Council’s Gender Pay Gap as at 31 March 2018.

Equal Pay legislation has been in force since 1970 and requires employers to ensure that there is no difference between pay for men and women doing the same job or work of equal value. The Gender Pay Gap differentiates in that it is a measure of disparity in pay between the average earnings of men and women. Because the gender pay gap is a comparison of average pay rates of all eligible employees this is affected by the proportion of men and women employed at each pay rate.

The Council operates a pay and grading structure underpinned by job evaluation schemes aimed at ensuring that there is no gender bias in the grading of posts.

Each grade has a number of incremental points. Progression through the grade is subject to annual performance review.  

In addition, the Council operates a performance related bonus scheme which provides for bonuses of 5% to be paid for exceptional performance identified through the Council’s appraisal and performance management scheme. 
 

Gender Pay Gap reporting
Pay rates Gender Pay Gap
Mean hourly rate 8.37%
Median hourly rate 9.12%
Pay Quartile information
Pay quartiles Women Men Total
Proportion of women and men in the upper quartile (paid above the 75th percentile point) 72.09% 27.91% 100%
Proportion of women and men in the upper middle quartile (paid above the median and at or below the 75th percentile point) 73.44% 26.56% 100%
Proportion of women and men in the lower middle quartile (paid above the 25th percentile point and at or below the median) 80.43% 19.57% 100%
Proportion of women and men in the lower quartile (paid below the 25th percentile point) 77.05% 22.95% 100%
Bonus pay Bonus Gender Pay Gap
Mean bonus 21.5%
Median bonus 17.1%
Bonuses paid
Women paid bonus as % of all women 5.58%
Men paid bonus as % of all men 8.26%

The Gender Pay Gap between men and women is 8.37% based on the mean hourly rate and 9.12% based on the median hourly rate. This is the pay gap across all grades and pay rates and means that on average, women are paid 8.37% less per hour than men. 

One reason for the differential is that there is not an even distribution of genders across pay rates. Proportionally more women are employed in the lower middle quartile and lower quartile (77% and 80% respectively) compared to the upper middle quartile and upper quartile (73% and 72% respectively). 
 

The Bonus Gender Pay Gap is 21.5%. This means that the average bonus paid to women divided by the total number of all eligible female employees is 21.5% lower than that paid to men. The median Bonus Gender Pay Gap is 17.1%.

This is the second year of reporting of the Gender Pay Gap in this format. Our pay gap stems from the fact that there is not an even distribution of men and women across all pay rates. For the pay gap to be eradicated there would need to be an even distribution of men and women across all pay rates. Further scrutiny of the bonus pay gap is being undertaken and the findings from that will be a consideration in the current review of the performance related pay scheme.

Further work is being undertaken to identify appropriate strategies for reducing the gender pay gap and these will be developed in consultation with staff and trade union representatives.